Archives: Frequently Asked Questions

What is “Anacostia 2032: Plan for a Fishable and Swimmable Anacostia River”?

Apr 06, 2012 | Posted in Anacostia Riverwalk Trail - Frequently Asked Questions, Frequently Asked Questions
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Anacostia 2032 is a roadmap that outlines five stages of phased improvements that will restore wildlife habitat and water quality. The plan will achieve: (1) a visually presentable river; (2) a boatable river; (3) a river that supports stable fish and wildlife populations; (4) a swimmable river; and (5) a river that supports fish that are safe to eat.…

Is there a plan to restore the Anacostia River?

Apr 06, 2012 | Posted in Anacostia Riverwalk Trail - Frequently Asked Questions, Frequently Asked Questions
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Yes. Led by the District Department of the Environment (DDOE), the District’s goal is to restore the Anacostia to a fishable and swimmable river by the year 2032.…

How does the District’s sewer system impact the Anacostia River?

Apr 06, 2012 | Posted in Anacostia Riverwalk Trail - Frequently Asked Questions, Frequently Asked Questions

When it rains heavily in areas served by a combined sewer system, the stormwater and wastewater flow through the same pipe. Some of the pipes aren’t big enough to handle the flows of very large rainstorms. So the overflow — a mixture of sewage and stormwater runoff – is discharged in local waterways, like the Anacostia River.…

Why is the health of the river endangered?

Apr 06, 2012 | Posted in Anacostia Riverwalk Trail - Frequently Asked Questions, Frequently Asked Questions

The water quality of the District portion of the Anacostia River is very poor, due partly to excessive trash. Each year 20,000 tons of trash enters the Anacostia River, damaging the river and wildlife habitat, clogging stormwater drains and denying residents recreational use of this urban waterway.…

How large is the Anacostia River Watershed?

Apr 06, 2012 | Posted in Anacostia Riverwalk Trail - Frequently Asked Questions, Frequently Asked Questions
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The Anacostia River Watershed covers portions of the District of Columbia, as well as Prince George’s and Montgomery counties in Maryland. The watershed is approximately 176 square miles (456 sq. km.) in area and roughly 25% of its land area lies in the District.…